melanoma

5 Key Facts About Skin Cancer

1. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States.

2. An estimated one in five Americans will develop one of the types of skin cancer (such as melanoma) by age 70.

3. People of all ages can get skin cancer.

4. Skin cancer is most common in people older than 50 and who have a family history of skin cancer. 

5. Most skin cancers can be cured if they're caught early.

*These facts were published on the Skin Cancer Foundation website. 

The ABCDE's of Melanoma | Melanoma Awareness Month

When it comes to melanoma, the world's most serious type of skin cancer, early detection is imperative. 

Melanoma can be cured if found and treated early. 

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Here are the types of skin markings on the body to look for in an easy way to remember we call, the ABCDE's of Melanoma: 

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A- ASYMMETRICAL SHAPE: MELANOMA LESIONS ARE OFTEN IRREGULAR, OR NOT SYMMETRICAL, IN SHAPE. BENIGN MOLES ARE USUALLY SYMMETRICAL.

B- BORDER: TYPICALLY, NON-CANCEROUS MOLES HAVE SMOOTH, EVEN BORDERS. MELANOMA LESIONS USUALLY HAVE IRREGULAR BORDERS THAT ARE DIFFICULT TO DEFINE.

C- COLOR: THE PRESENCE OF MORE THAN ONE COLOR (BLUE, BLACK, BROWN, TAN, ETC.) OR THE UNEVEN DISTRIBUTION OF COLOR CAN SOMETIMES BE A WARNING SIGN OF MELANOMA. BENIGN MOLES ARE USUALLY A SINGLE SHADE OF BROWN OR TAN.

D- DIAMETER: MELANOMA LESIONS ARE OFTEN GREATER THAN 6 MILLIMETERS IN DIAMETER (APPROXIMATELY THE SIZE OF A PENCIL ERASER).

E- EVOLUTION: THE EVOLUTION OF YOUR MOLE(S) HAS BECOME THE MOST IMPORTANT FACTOR TO CONSIDER WHEN IT COMES TO DIAGNOSING A MELANOMA. KNOWING WHAT IS NORMAL FOR YOU COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE. IF A MOLE HAS GONE THROUGH RECENT CHANGES IN COLOR AND/OR SIZE, BRING IT TO THE ATTENTION OF A DERMATOLOGIST IMMEDIATELY. 

If you see one or more of these markings on your skin, make an appointment with a dermatologist immediately. Catching melanoma early can make the difference between life and death. See your dermatologist regularly for skin screenings. 

You can also use the Ugly Duckling test to spot any suspicious markings on the body. If you're seeing a mole or marking that doesn't look like the rest, then that's a red flag. Get your skin checked immediately by a dermatologist

Please note: Not all melanomas fall within the ABCDE parameters so visit your dermatologist regularly to catch any potential issues early.

SHOP your UV Wristbands and Stickers to help keep your family protected all summer long!

 

Key Facts on Melanoma | Sunburn Alert

May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, accounting for over 5 million cases each year. Fortunately, this type of skin cancer is very preventable.  

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READ: Spotting Suspicious Moles

The American Cancer Society has estimated the number of melanoma cases in the United States for 2018: 

  • About 91,270 new melanomas will be diagnosed (about 55,150 in men and 36,120 in women).
  • About 9,320 people are expected to die of melanoma (about 5,990 men and 3,330 women).

Want to know exactly HOW to stay sun protected this summer? Here are our top four tips:

  1. Wear sunscreen: This is an obvious one. Apply after cleansing and before makeup about 15 minutes before going outside. 
  2. Reapply: This is forgotten by most people. Apply your sunscreen every two hours. 
  3. Wear protective attire: This includes hats, UV protected clothing and sunglasses. 
  4. Stay out of the sun: Make sure to seek shade when possible! 

Source: The American Cancer Society

Melanoma Rates Are Highest in Utah

Beaches, hot deserts, states closer to the equator. These are all factors you most likely associate when categorizing certain states as 'skin cancer hot spots'. You probably wouldn't include a snowy state in this particular category. Would you? 

According to a new report from the Center of Disease Control and Prevention, Utah (yes, Utah) has the highest incidences of skin cancer, specifically melanoma. 

The report, released this year, found Utah has the highest number of melanoma. The most recent date shows there were 42.3 cases per every 100,000 people in 2014. According to a news outlet, that's twice the national average

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Researchers aren't too sure why Utah has the highest rates of melanoma. It could be because of elevation. It is easy to get a sunburn at higher altitudes because there is less of the earth's atmosphere to block the sunlight. According to WebMD, "UV exposure increases about 4% for every 1000 ft (305 m) gain in elevation." 

Even if you don't live in Utah, it's important to wear SPF daily -- and reapply every two hours. And, if you're hitting the ski slopes this season, don't forget to apply sunscreen on your face, body and lips. 

 

Back-to-School Sun Safety Tips

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School is back in session, but that doesn't mean it's time to toss aside your sun protected items for next summer. During a typical school day, it's very common for children to receive a significant amount of sun exposure, particularly during recess. 

According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, five or more suburbs in youth increases lifestyle melanoma risk by 80 percent.The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays are also associated with 86 percent of melanomas and about 90 percent of non-melanoma skin cancers.

Below are three recommendations for keeping your children safe while in school: 

1. Hat: Pack a hat in your child's school bag. This will help protect their head, face and neck from the sun. 

2. Clothing: Remember, the more skin you cover, the better. Opt for UPF protective clothing as well. UV Skinz offers a great line for babies and toddlers. 

3. Sunscreen: Apply sunscreen on your child in the morning before heading outside to catch the bus. If your school allows students to wear sunscreen*, opt to bring in some UV Stickers & Wristbands so your child's class can all enjoy them! 

*Please note: "Many schools don’t allow students to use sunscreen or wear a hat outdoors during the school day without written permission from a physician. The Skin Cancer Foundation has created a sun protection form that parents and doctors can sign, allowing students to bring these items to school, apply and use as needed. The form is available at www.skincancer.org/schoolnote."

Source: The Skin Cancer Foundation

Spotting Melanoma On The Back

According to American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), the back is the most common location for melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. 

"Adequately applying sunscreen to your own back can be a difficult task, as demonstrated in the "Who’s Got Your Back?" video. Find a family member or friend who “has your back” when applying sunscreen. In addition, seek shade and wear protective clothing to protect your skin whenever possible."

Credit: AAD 

10 Quick Facts About Sunburn Alert

1. Our UV Wristbands and Stickers make it fun and easy to remember when it's time to reapply sunscreen and seek shade. 

See more here

2. Our patented color changing technology detects harmful UVA & UVB rays.

3. The bands and stickers work wet or dry and are ideal for children and adults.

4. They can be used with any sunscreen, whether it is a cream, spray or lotion.

5. Wristbands are adjustable to fit any size wrist- both kids and adults.

6. They can be recycled after one day of use.

7. You can find us in stores! 

8. When the Body Sticker begins turning blue, this is your reminder that your sunscreen is losing its Sun Protection Factor (SPF) and you need to reapply to the skin and wristband again.

9. When the band begins turning red, this is your reminder that your sunscreen is losing its Sun Protection Factor (SPF) and you need to reapply to the skin and wristband again.

10. They come in 15 and 30 packs.

 

5 [Sun Safe] Things To Know This Morning