American Cancer Society

How Common Is Melanoma?

The American Cancer Society estimates for melanoma in the United States for 2018 are:

  • About 91,270 new melanomas will be diagnosed (about 55,150 in men and 36,120 in women).
  • About 9,320 people are expected to die of melanoma (about 5,990 men and 3,330 women).

The rates of melanoma have been rising for the last 30 years.

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5 Surprising Skin Cancer Facts Everyone Needs To Know

According to The American Cancer Society, skin cancer is by far the most common type of cancer. Below are 5 surprising skin cancer facts everyone needs to know this summer: 

1. Exposure to tanning beds increases the risk of melanoma, especially in women 45 and younger.

2. Even one blistering sunburn during childhood or adolescence can nearly double a person's chance of developing melanoma. 

3. Melanoma survivors have an approximately nine-fold increased risk of developing another melanoma compared to the general population.

4. Men and women with a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer are at a higher risk of developing melanoma than people without a nonmelanoma skin cancer history. 

5. Before age 50, melanoma incidence rates are higher in women than in men, but by age 65, rates are twice as high in men. 

Credit: AAD

Key Statistics on Melanoma

Below are some important statistics from The American Cancer Society:

1. 52,170 men in the U.S. will be diagnosed with melanoma this year. 

2. Melanoma accounts for only about 1% of skin cancers but causes a large majority of skin cancer deaths.

3. The estimates for melanoma in the United States for 2017 are:

About 87,110 new melanomas will be diagnosed (about 52,170 in men and 34,940 in women).

About 9,730 people are expected to die of melanoma (about 6,380 men and 3,350 women).

4. The rates of melanoma have been rising for the last 30 years.

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