May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month

The American Academy of Dermatology’s (AAD) 2017 SPOT Skin Cancer campaign is called “Check Your Partner. Check Yourself" and is encouraging women to check both their partners and themselves for signs of skin cancer. 

When detected early, melanoma is highly treatable. According to AAD, "Research has shown that women are nine times more likely than men to notice melanoma on others, which means women could help save their partners' lives by helping them spot skin cancer. This is especially important for men over 50 as they have an increased risk of developing melanoma compared to the general population." 

READ: Skin Screening 101

Here are the types of skin markings on the body to look for in a fun, easy way to remember we call, the ABCDE's of Melanoma

A- Asymmetrical Shape: Melanoma lesions are often irregular, or not symmetrical, in shape. Benign moles are usually symmetrical. B- Border: Typically, non-cancerous moles have smooth, even borders. Melanoma lesions usually have irregular borders that are difficult to define. C- Color: The presence of more than one color (blue, black, brown, tan, etc.) or the uneven distribution of color can sometimes be a warning sign of melanoma. Benign moles are usually a single shade of brown or tan. D- Diameter: Melanoma lesions are often greater than 6 millimeters in diameter (approximately the size of a pencil eraser). E- Evolution: The evolution of your mole(s) has become the most important factor to consider when it comes to diagnosing a melanoma. Knowing what is normal for you could save your life. If a mole has gone through recent changes in color and/or size, bring it to the attention of a dermatologist immediately.

A- Asymmetrical Shape: Melanoma lesions are often irregular, or not symmetrical, in shape. Benign moles are usually symmetrical.

B- Border: Typically, non-cancerous moles have smooth, even borders. Melanoma lesions usually have irregular borders that are difficult to define.

C- Color: The presence of more than one color (blue, black, brown, tan, etc.) or the uneven distribution of color can sometimes be a warning sign of melanoma. Benign moles are usually a single shade of brown or tan.

D- Diameter: Melanoma lesions are often greater than 6 millimeters in diameter (approximately the size of a pencil eraser).

E- Evolution: The evolution of your mole(s) has become the most important factor to consider when it comes to diagnosing a melanoma. Knowing what is normal for you could save your life. If a mole has gone through recent changes in color and/or size, bring it to the attention of a dermatologist immediately.

This May, and throughout the entire summer, we encourage you to practice sun safety and schedule an annual skin exam with your dermatologist.