5 Surprising Skin Cancer Facts Everyone Needs To Know

According to The American Cancer Society, skin cancer is by far the most common type of cancer. Below are 5 surprising skin cancer facts everyone needs to know this summer: 

1. Exposure to tanning beds increases the risk of melanoma, especially in women 45 and younger.

2. Even one blistering sunburn during childhood or adolescence can nearly double a person's chance of developing melanoma. 

3. Melanoma survivors have an approximately nine-fold increased risk of developing another melanoma compared to the general population.

4. Men and women with a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer are at a higher risk of developing melanoma than people without a nonmelanoma skin cancer history. 

5. Before age 50, melanoma incidence rates are higher in women than in men, but by age 65, rates are twice as high in men. 

Credit: AAD

Don't Fry Day

The National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention declares today (the Friday before Memorial Day) as "Don't Fry Day." This day is to encourage sun safety awareness throughout the world. 

"To help reduce rising rates of skin cancer from overexposure to the ultraviolet (UV) rays of the sun, the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention has designated the Friday before Memorial Day as “Don’t Fry Day” to encourage sun safety awareness and to remind everyone to protect their skin while enjoying the outdoors." 

They recommend these top sun safety tips: 

  • Do Not Burn or Tan
  • Seek Shade
  • Wear Sun-Protective Clothing
  • Generously Apply Sunscreen
  • Use Extra Caution Near Water, Snow, and Sand
  • Get Vitamin D Safely
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Read more on the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention website here & have a sun safe weekend ahead! 

Credit: National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention 

 

 

ABCDE's of Melanoma

We've talked about the ABCDE's of Melanoma before, but with this month being Melanoma Awareness Month we decided to refresh your memory and take a look at exactly what these letters mean.

These characteristics are used by dermatologists to classify melanoma. Look for these particular signs: Asymmetry, irregular Borders, more than one or uneven distribution of Color, or a large (greater than 6mm) Diameter, and Evolution of the mole. 

AXA PPP healthcare, a healthcare insurance firm, devised this video to help remember the ABCDE's. 

Take a look at your skin and thoroughly exam every mole and spot. Contact your dermatologist if you see something spacious.

May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month

The American Academy of Dermatology’s (AAD) 2017 SPOT Skin Cancer campaign is called “Check Your Partner. Check Yourself" and is encouraging women to check both their partners and themselves for signs of skin cancer. 

When detected early, melanoma is highly treatable. According to AAD, "Research has shown that women are nine times more likely than men to notice melanoma on others, which means women could help save their partners' lives by helping them spot skin cancer. This is especially important for men over 50 as they have an increased risk of developing melanoma compared to the general population." 

READ: Skin Screening 101

Here are the types of skin markings on the body to look for in a fun, easy way to remember we call, the ABCDE's of Melanoma

A- Asymmetrical Shape: Melanoma lesions are often irregular, or not symmetrical, in shape. Benign moles are usually symmetrical. B- Border: Typically, non-cancerous moles have smooth, even borders. Melanoma lesions usually have irregular borders that are difficult to define. C- Color: The presence of more than one color (blue, black, brown, tan, etc.) or the uneven distribution of color can sometimes be a warning sign of melanoma. Benign moles are usually a single shade of brown or tan. D- Diameter: Melanoma lesions are often greater than 6 millimeters in diameter (approximately the size of a pencil eraser). E- Evolution: The evolution of your mole(s) has become the most important factor to consider when it comes to diagnosing a melanoma. Knowing what is normal for you could save your life. If a mole has gone through recent changes in color and/or size, bring it to the attention of a dermatologist immediately.

A- Asymmetrical Shape: Melanoma lesions are often irregular, or not symmetrical, in shape. Benign moles are usually symmetrical.

B- Border: Typically, non-cancerous moles have smooth, even borders. Melanoma lesions usually have irregular borders that are difficult to define.

C- Color: The presence of more than one color (blue, black, brown, tan, etc.) or the uneven distribution of color can sometimes be a warning sign of melanoma. Benign moles are usually a single shade of brown or tan.

D- Diameter: Melanoma lesions are often greater than 6 millimeters in diameter (approximately the size of a pencil eraser).

E- Evolution: The evolution of your mole(s) has become the most important factor to consider when it comes to diagnosing a melanoma. Knowing what is normal for you could save your life. If a mole has gone through recent changes in color and/or size, bring it to the attention of a dermatologist immediately.

This May, and throughout the entire summer, we encourage you to practice sun safety and schedule an annual skin exam with your dermatologist.